Writing

Innovation and Intellectual Property: Collaborative Dynamics in Africa is the most recent of my five books in the fields of innovation, intellectual property, and global trade and development. While this volume of empirical case studies reports on current realities, its sister publication, Knowledge and Innovation in Africa: Scenarios for the Future, explores pathways ahead. Earlier publications include Implementing the World Intellectual Property Organization’s Development Agenda as well as Access to Knowledge in Africa: The Role of Copyright. I am also a co-author of Canada’s leading property law casebook, and managing editor and co-author of a practitioner’s handbook on aspects of administrative law.

I have published three dozen peer-reviewed chapters and articles across the disciplines of law, business, political science, and public policy. These scholarly publications—many in top-ranked journals—complement a range of national and international policy papers, business strategy briefings, and similar outputs designed to mobilize research into action. You can also find my ideas expressed in widely read newspaper and magazine editorials accessible to professional audiences or the general public.

 

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Remedies for Biotechnology Patent Infringement

A pair courts decisions have a big impact on remedies available for biotechnology patent infringement. Defendants in biotech patent lawsuits seem to be better off than previously thought. The result could mean revaluing Canadian patent portfolios based on enforceability issues, and revising business and intellectual property practices accordingly. Read the...

Access to Knowledge in Africa: The Role of Copyright

This book gives the reader an understanding of the legal and practical issues posed by copyright for access to education and learning materials in Africa, and identifies the relevant lessons, best policies and best practices that would broaden and deepen this access. The emergence of the Internet and the...

Exhaustion of Intellectual Property

Though the scope of the doctrine of exhaustion, and the terminology used to describe it, is somewhat different in the contexts of copyrights, trade-marks, and patents, and in different jurisdictions, the concept and function are universal in intellectual property law. In Canada, the applicability of the exhaustion doctrine to copyrights,...

Respect and Reality are Keys to Copyright Reform

Copyright can be a polarizing topic, caricatured with imagery of toiling creators and freeloading pirates. The latest line is that Canada’s laws are hopelessly antiquated and can’t possibly cope with new cultural or technological phenomena. This kind of talk may produce headlines and a quick batch of legal reforms, but it does nothing to constructively facilitate intelligent policymaking. That requires a more nuanced point of view.

Who Really Owns the Stanley Cup?

As most of you remember, there was one year where the Stanley Cup was not awarded because of a labour dispute between the National Hockey League and its players.  This dispute resulted in the 2004-2005 lockout, as well as a lawsuit over the ownership of the Stanley Cup. The...

Music Distribution & the Internet

My review of Andrew Sparrow’s new book “Music Distribution and the Internet” was published in latest issue of FreePint. Read it here …

Social Hosts Not Liable for Drunk Drivers Leaving Parties

In Childs v Desmoreux, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that party hosts are generally not liable if their guests drive drunk and injure third parties. My case comment, “Social Host Liability in Canada,” explores the major implications …